The Kesagami River Solo Episode 7 Keep Your Batteries Charged

The Kesagami River Solo Episode 7 Keep Your Batteries Charged

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Lake Kesagami is known as an exceptional Pike fishery, and Pike in the 42inch range are often caught by fisherman who fly-in to Kesagami Wilderness Loge. Sadly, it looked like I’d missed the window to tangle with one of Kesagami’s leviathan sized Pike. It’s the spring and early summer when the fishing is exceptional there. I was there in mid Aug, after the lodge had closed for the season.
One of the many huge Northern Pike caught and released by the guests of Kesagami WIlderness Lodge Photo: Kesagami Wilderness Lodge
One of the many huge Northern Pike caught and released by the guests of Kesagami WIlderness Lodge Photo: Kesagami Wilderness Lodge
 When summer progresses, the water temperature warms, causing the fish to become lethargic. In any Pike lake, large Pike seek deeper and cooler water when things warm up. Despite its massive surface area, Kesagami is a very shallow lake. And, considering its size and latitude, it gets warm by late summer; good for swimming, not Pike fishing. I was also experiencing a serious heat wave while there.
Before leaving camp on the morning of Day 5, I set up my solar charging system to take advantage of the blazing sun. After spreading my Brunton solar panel across my spray deck, and tying it down, I plugged the connector cable into my Brunton battery pack at my feet. With the battery fully drained, it’ll take eight or nine hours to fully charge it on an overcast day, less time with any sun. The large battery can then be used to charge all your camera batteries, and communications equipment, even a lap top.
The author paddles across Lake Kesagami, his canoe outfitted with a solar panel. Photo: Jim Baird
The author paddles across Lake Kesagami, his canoe outfitted with a solar panel. Photo: Jim Baird
Right after pushing off, I chatted with the float plane pilot who landed near my camp. The pilot told me that the weather would be changing in the near future, and he mentioned some rain was on the way. This would prove to be a substantial understatement.
It’s a 15kilometer paddle to the outlet of the Kesagami River from where I camped near the lodge. Taking advantage of the nearly windless day, I paddled straight there. Windy weather can pin a canoeist down for days on any big lake. Near the mouth, I got out of the canoe to check out a Cree camp I came across. It wasn’t long after I left the camp that I was lucky enough to see a Woodland Caribou; and from pretty close up too! It walked right past me as I sat in the canoe. Seeing the Caribou fully made up for the lack of fish caught, but that problem was soon a thing of the past. Although I didn’t get a gargantuan Pike, a short distance down river I hooked into a couple nice Pickerel and two small Pike. Things were looking good.
With a tasty dinner in the works, I paddled well into the evening and neared the infamous whitewater section of the Kesagami River.
Two Pickerel caught on a #4 Mepps spinner photo: Jim Baird
Two Pickerel caught on a #4 Mepps spinner photo: Jim Baird

 

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